Review Author
Timothy Rentz
Published on
December 5, 2015
Company
MiniArt
Scale
1/35
MSRP
$31.00

The Kit

The plastic motorcycle parts are on a single sprue, the figure on a separate sprue, plus a sprue of clear parts, a set of photo etched parts, and a decal sheet with markings for the motorcycle and uniform patches for the figure. The instruction sheet is very nice: Large, clear, and in color.

The parts are all very cleanly molded, no issues with flash, sink holes or ejector pin marks, and the detail is crisp. The kit also includes plastic jigs for bending the photoetched parts.

The Build

Following the instructions, the build begins with bending the photo-etched parts. The spokes for the wheels are no problem, but the fender supports for the front wheel assembly were a bit challenging. In order to get the proper curve where the supports attach to the front fender, I used a small paintbrush handle, pressing into the cutting matt to get the proper curvature. I couldn’t get a sufficiently curved bend using the jig alone.

Review Author
Mike Hinderliter
Published on
December 5, 2015
Company
AOA Decals
Scale
1/72
MSRP
$16.50

This is the third set of 1/72 decals from AOA Decals. The decals are printed by Cartigraf of Italy, look very nice, are clear, in register, and work very well. These decals are spaced very close together so use a really good pair of decal scissors so you don’t accidentally cut the one next to it.

The first test for decals, that I use, is to apply the walkway markings because they are long and straight. If they are really long you can cut them apart and mate them up again but that wasn’t needed here. These went on properly with no problem at all. I was very impressed with the ease and smoothness with which they could be applied. They came off the sheet well and I was able to move them into place once I got them on.

Review Author
Marc K. Blackburn
Published on
December 4, 2015
Company
Airfix
Scale
1/48
MSRP
$14.99

Airfix continues to knock out quality 1/48th kits as they continue surging ahead making a wide variety of kits. Their newest offering is a 1/48th version of the Bedford MWD truck. A 4x2 vehicle that entered service right before the war started, the Bedford saw service in France in 1940 and would continue to service with the RAF and the British Army after they re-entered the continent in June, 1944. The kit provides parts, decals, and paint schemes for two vehicles – the early version that served in France in 1940 and the later version that served with the RAF in 1943.

Review Author
Jim Pearsall
Published on
December 4, 2015
Company
Brengun
Scale
1/144
MSRP
$12.79

The VZ-9 Avrocar is marketed as a “what if” kit, but to my surprise there actually WERE two of these things built and “flown”.

The idea originated in the early 1950s as a U.S. Air Force project, built by AVRO Canada, for a high-speed, high performance fighter with high speed and maneuverability. The performance didn’t pan out, and the U.S. Army took over the project with the idea of having something like a high speed, highly maneuverable helicopter. The two prototypes were built in 1958 and 59. The project was abandoned in 1961.

One of the prototypes is on display at the US Air Force Museum at Wright-Patterson AFB, Dayton, Ohio.

Review Author
Jim Pearsall
Published on
December 4, 2015
Company
Brengun
Scale
1/144
MSRP
$5.95

I recently built and reviewed Brengun’s USN Tow Tractor (BRL 144025) used on aircraft carriers. One thing that I said was missing was the tow bar to allow the tractor to move the planes around the deck. So here it is.

The entire kit is a single resin cast and a single PE fret. The resin parts are the bars for the tow bar. The PE is the connectors to hook the assembly to the tractor at one end and the aircraft at the other.

Assembly Preparation

The assembly is both easy and difficult. The easy part is that there aren’t a lot of parts, and they are logically set up. The difficult part is that the PE parts are all very small and easy to lose. One way I overcome this difficulty is using a jeweler’s apron, which anchors to my workbench at one end, and the other end has a loop which is around my neck. This way if I drop a part, it usually falls into the apron, where it can be recovered. The carpet monster is bereft.