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Review Author
Rob Benson
Published on
Company
Master Model
Scale
1/350
MSRP
$10.00

Thank you to Master Model and the IPMS Reviewer Corps for the privilege of reviewing this excellent replacement part set offered by Master Model in the Sea Master Series for 350-scale ship models. The replacement masts will add a crisp eye-catching detail in a highly visible part of any modern ship model. Master Model is continuing an excellent line of replacement brass parts for ship models.

Review Author
Floyd S. Werner Jr.
Published on
Company
Eduard
Scale
1/48
MSRP
$12.95

The option to open up the gondolas frequently found under the wings of the Bf-109G is something that is up to the individual. It does add a visual interest and looks great in diorama.

In this set from Eduard, the parts are packaged in the typical plastic packaging with foam inserts, which protects the parts during shipping, you get 12 resin parts which are perfectly cast in light grey resin and a fret of photo etch.

Review Author
Tom Moon
Published on
Company
Italeri
Scale
1/250
MSRP
$33.99

The best way to start this model is to clip all the parts and mark them with the call out number as not all the columns are the same. Some are taller and others are shaped differently. Then clean up all the molding lines and paint these parts. The painting is problematic as they call out some colors like Marble and ask you to mix the following colors Flat Skin Tone Warm, Flat light flesh and flat white. There are no percentages and then to top it off they say the Pentelic marble is an impeccable white with uniform, weak yellow coloration along with a photo of what the real marble looks like. I just painted the base a general white with a subdued dark wash to show the seams and slight textured surface of the base.

Review Author
Ron Verburg
Published on
Company
Airfix
Scale
1/32
MSRP
$29.99

History

The 17 Pounder was the largest of three anti-tank guns used by the British Army in the Second World War. Design work on the 17 Pounder began in April 1941 with the aim of replacing existing anti-tank guns. First deliveries of the new gun were made to Royal Artillery units in August 1942 and this type first saw action at the Battle of Medenine, North Africa, on 6 March 1943. The 17 Pounder was widely used in Italy and northern Europe and continued into post-war service for many years. Its use extended to being employed as a field gun, its high explosive shell proving a particularly useful charge in this role.

Construction

The kit is produced by Airfix, a well-known maker of scale model kits. The kit arrives in the usual red box with artwork of the gun crew firing the 17 pounder. There are some photos displayed on the side of the box showing close up detail of the gun and crew.

Review Author
Dan Brown
Published on
Company
Dragon Models
Scale
1/35
MSRP
$85.00

Towards the closing days of WW2 Germany was desperate for any type of functioning fighting vehicles they could get. This led to the mounting different weapons on any available chassis that they had. One of the weirder vehicles was created by mounting the infamous 88mm Flak 36 on a Panzer IV chassis. There is very little information available on this vehicle but it does appear to have at least made it to the prototype phase. The chassis was not modified with stabilizers, so there is some speculation that the 88mm’s traverse was limited to just a few degrees off front center, similar to the Ferdinand. Also the Panzer IV was not designed to handle the recoil of the 88mm so the recoil may have shattered the suspension when fired.

Dragon recently released this oddity in kit form, however, it appears that the kit may actually be just a re-boxing of an older Cyber Hobby white box kit that has become a bit of collector’s item.