Review Author
Jim Pearsall
Published on
May 31, 2015
Company
Eduard
Scale
1/144
MSRP
$24.95

Eduard has come out with two double kits of the MiG-15. This one is the Czechoslovakian MiGs. There are two differences between the kits. First is markings. This one is for Eduard’s “home team”, with 7 different Czech MiGs. The second difference is that one of the MiGs in this kit has three guns in the nose instead of two. This is the build with three guns.

Since this is a double kit, you get two of everything. I used the other kit to do the Eduard PE upgrade. I was also gratified to see that there are two slightly different sets of main wheels per kit. There’s also the usual canopy mask and wheel masks, which are top quality.

Review Author
Greg Wise
Published on
May 31, 2015
Company
Hasegawa
Scale
1/48
MSRP
$42.99

History Brief

Code named ‘Pete’ by the Allied Forces the Mitsubishi F1M2 Type 0 Observation Seaplane Model 11 was originally built as a catapult-launched reconnaissance seaplane. In essence, the Pete was a two man crew, single-engine biplane with a main central float and two auxiliary outrigger floats.

Review Author
Clarence Wentzel
Published on
June 5, 2015
Company
Pavla Models
Scale
1/72
MSRP
$21.75

The Navy FJ-4 was, to many people, the culmination of the basic North American Sabre Jet. This final naval variant featured a more powerful engine which required a larger intake, a shorter, deeper fuselage, a larger tail, larger wing area and a longer nose gear. Its front line service was short, however. Although the FJ-4B was loved by its pilots, by the late ‘50’s the Fury was being phased out by newer, less expensive fighter and attack aircraft. They referred to it as the “Cadillac”, while its counterpart and eventual replacement, the A4D, was referred to as the “Tinkertoy”.

Emhar issued the FJ-4B in 1/72nd scale in 1990 and is a great kit. There are really only two shortfalls of the kit; the first being a rather basic cockpit and the second being a crude, short exhaust/jet pipe. Pavla has recently released resin detail parts for the cockpit and the exhaust.

Book Author(s)
Yefrim Gordon, Sergey Komissarov, and Dmitriy Komissarov
Review Author
Hub Plott
Published on
June 5, 2015
Company
Hikoki Publications
MSRP
$56.95

This book is the comprehensive history of the fighters produced by the Yakolev Design Bureau during World War Two. The Yak-1 first flew in 1940 under the designation I-26, changing to the now familiar Yak-1 when production began at the end of that year. The authors trace the development of these designs and offer the reader a comprehensive history from drawing board to final use. Ever wonder why the Yak-3 was actually produced after the Yak-9? It is all here.

The book is divided into 9 chapters. Chapter one is comprised of 58 pages and deals with the design, development and use of the Yak1. This begins with the I-26 initial variant and the loss and death of Yakolev’s chief test pilot Yulian Piontkovsky. Each variant and weapons system is covered.

Chapter two covers the I-28, I-30 and heavy fighter projects. These 14 pages deal with some prototypes and dead-end Yakolev developments

Book Author(s)
Paolo Varriale; Illustrators: Roberto Zanella, Ronny Bar, Martin Digmayer
Review Author
Roger Rasor
Published on
June 5, 2015
Company
Albatros Productions, Ltd.
MSRP
$22.00

By 1916, the little Nieuport 11, also known to the French Militaire by its initials BB (which the French pronounced bébé), had succeeded in putting an end to the Fokker Scourge and therefore gaining the respect of ally and foe alike. A higher horsepower version, known as the Nieuport 17 followed and built on that legacy, becoming the preferred mount for many of the Allies’ first generation Aces. But subsequent efforts to continually improve upon Nieuport’s basic Vee-strutter design fell short of expectations with the introduction of the 24, 24bis and later the 27. Failing to match the performance of a new generation of fighters, these Nieuport designs generated little enthusiasm among French pilots who instead looked forward to flying the much-desired new SPAD. Unfortunately, SPAD production could not match demand and there was a war to fight so the new Nieuport fighters began arriving at the front in early 1917.

Review Author
Rod Lees
Published on
June 5, 2015
Company
Master Model
Scale
1/48
MSRP
$3.30

Thanks to Piotr at Master models for providing one more great pitot tube to improve our models, and thanks to IPMS Reviewer Corps leaders for sending this my way!

This pitot tube/air probe is a simple upgrade to Airfix’ most recent 1/48 Jet model, the Folland Gnat T1. Previously reviewed as a build kit, I figured it would only be a matter of time before Master released this for the Gnat…

On side-by-side comparison, it is evident Master Model’s pitot is an improvement on the kit item. Finesse, is, as usual, the key word to describe what Master model products provide over kit injection molded pitot tubes. There is just no way plastic, (or frankly resin replacements), can compete with metal. Cleanup of the plastic version’s injection port is “dicy” at best, particularly on the side of the tube… I rarely have success with this, so I have, in the past, opted for needles. Not optimal, but acceptable.

Review Author
Roger Rasor
Published on
June 5, 2015
Company
Eduard
Scale
1/32
MSRP
$23.00

With the ever growing number of 1/32 scale rigged aircraft kits on the market, Eduard now offers a generic photo-etched set of 1/32 scale flying wires and stretchers (AKA Turnbuckles). Metal flying wires are a logical and much desired aftermarket detail set for model builders wishing to accurately replicate the metal wires used on most Allied aircraft built after 1915/16. Unlike the majority of other p/e sets cataloged by Eduard, a specific aircraft type (or kit) is not specified. Instead, the fret includes 33 anchoring rings, wires of differing lengths with a stretcher near one end and others including stretchers with tabs that may be used as attachment points to fit a variety of aircraft (see the photo of the fret below). Model builders will need to determine if this set fits their needs. I say ‘fits’ because the wires themselves are provided in only two lengths…2 1/14” and 5 1/8”.

Review Author
John Noack
Published on
June 5, 2015
Company
Gallery Models
Scale
1/48
MSRP
$55.98

I've had a hankering to build an H-34 Choctaw for some time now. When the Gallery Models kit was released, I debated which version to build, but I've always had an eye for that distinctive Marine Green under White scheme on the VH-34 variant. When Dave offered up the 1/48 VH-34D Marine One kit, I jumped at it.

Review Author
Scott Hollingshead
Published on
June 5, 2015
Company
Eduard
Scale
1/72
MSRP
$9.95

Developed as a Sidewinder for the U.S. Air Force, the AIM-9E was based on the U.S. Navy AIM-9B, but with some enhancements, based on early combat challenges of the B- model. The cooling for the detector used Peltier thermoelectric cooling, and the forward canards were changed. Ford produced 5000 of the missiles from re-purposed AIM-9B missiles. The AIM-9E measured 9 feet, 10 inches long, 22 inches across the rear fins, had a diameter of 5 inches, and weighed in at 164 pounds. The AIM-9E is credited with aerial victories over six MiG-21 aircraft during the Vietnam War being launched from F-4D and E Phantom II’s of the US Air force.

Book Author(s)
Martyn Chorlton
Review Author
Roger Rasor
Published on
June 8, 2015
Company
Crecy Publishing, Ltd.
MSRP
$39.95

The growing interest in World War I aircraft among model builders and aviation history buffs has fostered an increase in the variety of publications offering information about the subject. Among them is a well-researched hard cover book recently published by Crecy Publishing (and distributed in the US by Specialty Press) about the military airfields that populated the British landscape during and after WWI. The Brits referred to these facilities as Aerodromes, and they were numerous. In FORGOTTEN AERODROMES OF WORLD WAR I, author Martyn Chorlton documents a total of 502 RFC and RNAS sites by country and county. Many began as nothing more than a grassy field with a simple structure or two. Most have been lost to other uses in the nearly 100 years since they were constructed, but some still serve. Remnants of others can be found, but many of their names are etched in history.