Review Author
Floyd S. Werner Jr.
Published on
October 8, 2010
Company
Loon Models
Scale
1/48
MSRP
$3.00

Eduard’s FW-190s are some of my favorite models. One ‘nitpicky’ thing is that you have to cut open the wing root gun covers so that the kit parts will fit in a closed position. Sometimes this results in a less than perfect fit, depending on how well you cut them. Well you don’t have to do it anymore. Loon Models provides the two covers with the trailing edges suitably thinned so you no longer have to cut into the wings. This will make that whole process so much simpler and ensure a perfect fit.

Molded in light yellow resin that is blemish free these are easy additions to the kit.

Highly recommended.

Thanks to Loon Models for the review copy. Tell them IPMS/USA sent you. Note: Loon Models is the “house-brand” for Roll Models, Inc.

Review Author
Roger Carrano
Published on
October 8, 2010
Company
Quickboost
Scale
1/48
MSRP
$8.50

Recommended Kit: Trumpeter

I have read many reviews about Trumpeter’s C-47 kit and, although they range from good to great, most reviews seem to pick up on the errors where the rudder and the cowlings are concerned. This review will cover Quickboost’s corrected cowlings as compared with the kits cowlings.

Review Author
Dave Koukol
Published on
October 5, 2010
Company
Trumpeter
Scale
1/48
MSRP
$59.95

Background

In the decade following the end of World War II, aircraft performance and design advanced at a dizzying pace. Proposed in 1951 and first flown in 1953, the North American F-100 Super Sabre followed in the footsteps of legendary P-51 Mustang and F-86 Sabre, and was the first American production fighter capable of flying at sustained supersonic speeds in level flight. Although intended as a clear-weather daytime air superiority fighter, the “Hun” saw its most notable service during the Vietnam War as a fighter-bomber. The quantum leap in performance over previous fighters was accompanied by an unprecedented accident rate, as Air Force pilots with supersonic experience were few and far between outside of the flight test community. In order to curb the high accident rate, North American developed a two-seat trainer variant on its own nickel, and the design rapidly evolved into a two-seat variant of the F-100D, designated F-100F. Although it did little to reduce the accident rate, the F-100F played an instrumental role in the birth of SEAD (suppression of enemy air defenses) mission as the first “Wild Weasel” platform and as a forward air control (FAC) aircraft.

Book Author(s)
Author: Krzystozt Mucha, Scale Drawings:Arkadiusz Wrόbel, Color Profiles:Damian Majsak
Review Author
Les Walden
Published on
October 3, 2010
Company
Kagero Publishing
MSRP
$24.75

Kagero has come up with another winner if you’re a Panzer IV nut, like I am. The book is soft cover with heavy stock and full color art on the front and back covers. This book covers the Panzer IV J. The strength of the book isn’t the text, unless you read Polish. The 1/35 scale drawings are beautiful showing all the angles of the tank, in all twenty seven pages. The drawings do have some text in English, so you know what variant you’re looking at. The reader does know which production version is being represented. Included are exploded drawings of the different muffler systems, return rollers, idler wheels, road wheel assemblies, treads, muzzle brakes, cupolas, and armor skirts. There are also four pages of 1/48 and 1/72 scale drawings. Thirty-one pages in all. Add to this there are four pages of full color prints. They come with two tanks on each page.

Book Author(s)
Peter Muller and Wolfgang Zimmerman
Review Author
Don Barry
Published on
September 30, 2010
Company
Casemate Publishers
MSRP
$69.00

This is the first of a two-volume set detailing the history, tactical development, and use of the various marks of the Sturmgeschutz III, commonly referred to as the StuG III. Volume 1 is predominately text. Volume 2 is mostly photographic in content.

This book offers a wealth of data for modelers, as well as those more interested in the technical aspects of this weapons system. Chapters include: background, technical development, series production, design variants A thru G, the factories involved in production, and combat records and troop reports.

There is a full developmental section, where the evolution of tactics is examined. Due to the requirements of the conflict, a weapon developed to support the infantry with mobile heavy firepower, evolved into a premier tank killer and improvised tank replacement. A howitzer-armed version, the Sturmhaubitze, was introduced to remedy this, with limited success mostly due to the limited numbers produced.