Review Author
Jim Stratton
Published on
March 1, 2014
Company
Bronco Models
Scale
1/35
MSRP
$44.95

Bronco continues their series of GPWs with one that now tows the M3A1 37mm AT gun. After the War Department determined that Willys couldn’t meet the governments demand for vehicles, Ford was given a contract to license build the GPW version of the Willys MB (Jeep). The GPW differs from the MB in a few areas. The front cross member under the grille is a tubular piece on the Willys while on the GPW it was an inverted “U” channel. Ford also introduced the familiar stamped front grille which was then adopted by Willys. Another difference is the lids on the tool boxes on either side of the rear seat. The Willys’ tool boxes have plain flat covers while the GPW’s lids are embossed. The vehicle itself is listed as a Mod. 1942, and correctly has the Ford logo stamped on the rear panel, as both Ford and Willys had their company name stamped on the rear panel. This practice was ended in July of 1942 by order of the War Department. Thus, only the first 2000 vehicles had the Ford logo.

Review Author
Chris Smith
Published on
March 2, 2014
Company
Polar Lights
Scale
1/25
MSRP
$29.95

Introduction

Tommy Grove drove this 1969 Mustang based funny car through two seasons. The car depicted in this kit was one of the first funny cars to break the 200mph barrier. Running a 1500hp blown 427ci single overhead cam (SOHC) Ford, this car was hard to beat in its time.

The Kit

Harkening back to the days when artwork sold models, this box is graced with a cool burnout photo. Inside you get about 80 parts in white, chrome and clear plastic. The tires are rubber, with the rear tires done with backside inserts and preprinted “Racemaster” lettering. A single sheet of instructions and a nice decal sheet complete the package. There are extra parts that allow you to choose the style of wheels (front and rear), front end and the type of engine intake you want. The photos on the box confirm that there were several part variations on this car during its short career.

Review Author
Dave Morrissette
Published on
March 2, 2014
Company
Scale Aircraft Modelling
MSRP
$7.50

Each issue of Scale Aircraft Modelling follows a basic design and format. There are usually two feature articles, an “Aviation in Profile” piece, industry news and a series of “Compact Build Reviews.”

The feature articles for this issue cover the build of a Trumpeter 1/32 Mig-17 in Cuban markings and a 1/32 Revell Bf-109G-6. The Mig-17 build, by Brian Wakeman, covers the construction and painting of one of Trumpeter’s early efforts. He modifies the kit with five Profimodeller sets and one Eduard set. The kit is then finished with a bright Cuban paint scheme and great weathering.

The other feature article is from Jay Laverty, and covers building the Revell 1/32 Bf-109G-6 (early and late) kit. Mr. Laverty concentrates on painting and weathering with some aftermarket being used for both the cockpit and the decals used for adding Swastikas. Weathering is done with oils, and shows excellent methods of getting streaks and subtle weathering.

Review Author
Dick Montgomery
Published on
March 3, 2014
Company
Plusmodel
MSRP
$15.00

Good tools make modeling easier, and every modeler needs several types of tweezers and the toolbox. Plusmodel is now offering tweezers designed for the modeler.

Flat Tip tweezers are very useful tools when handling plastic bits and decals. The key factor with Flat Tip tweezers is that the jaws are parallel and “meet” when closed without any overhang or gap between the jaws. We’ve all seen “inexpensive” flat tip tweezers that, from the get-go, display a gap. The Plusmodel Flat Tip Tweezers, # 026, come out of the package with a perfect “bite”. These tweezers close and grip well.

Crossed Tweezers are closed “at rest” and open when squeezed. Crossed Tweezers are excellent tools used to grip and hold small parts. The Plusmodel Crossed Type Tweezers, #021 has pointed tips (some Crossed Tweezers are engineered with flat tips) and can pick up very small items, holding them firmly but gently.

Review Author
Mark Aldrich
Published on
March 3, 2014
Company
Meng Model
Scale
1/35
MSRP
$64.99

Achzarit – (“Cruel” in Hebrew with female inflection) is the name given to one of the IDF’s newer Armored Personnel Carriers. The other is Namer and based on the Merkava Chassis. The Achzarit is based on the Russian T-54/55 chassis that the IDF captured so many of in the previous wars with her neighboring Nations. No matter what name the IDF gave it, it could not describe near perfection. The Israelis are the ONLY Nation that has ever put crew protection and survivability forefront in the design of armored vehicles. The Achzarit is referred to as a heavy APC and rightfully so. It weighs in at 44 tons and is designed to transport the troops into combat and also survive confrontations in urban scenarios. It carries a dismount squad of nine and three vehicle crew members. It mounts three 7.62 FN Mags and another FN Mag mounted in a Rafael OWS for the vehicle commander.

Review Author
Jim Pearsall
Published on
March 3, 2014
Company
Eduard
Scale
1/72
MSRP
$22.95

The Eduard Weekend kits are designed for a fairly quick and easy build, but as I proceeded through this project it took me much longer than a single weekend. The build was more like four weeks, working an hour or so each day. When it was time to write this review, I checked the catalog at Eduard, and it says that the kit doesn’t include masks or PE. But the mask and PE were in the box when I opened it!! Dave Morrissette was patient with my query. I got the PE and mask in the box, but they are for separate reviews. So look for the reviews elsewhere on the IPMS/USA reviews page.

Review Author
Jim Pearsall
Published on
March 3, 2014
Company
Eduard
Scale
1/72
MSRP
$9.95

This is the canopy mask for the Eduard 1/72 Bf-110G-4 Night fighter. It’s recommended for the Weekend kit, which is reviewed here: Eduard Bf-110g-4 weekend kit The ProfiPACK kit comes with the mask.

You get the mask and a very good set of instructions.

The mask is die cut on Kabuki tape, nice and thin and it sticks marvelously.

I have one trick. It’s very hard to see the edges of the mask items when they’re on the backing sheet. I slather on a tiny bit of acrylic black, like what’s used for weathering, and it picks out the edges nicely.

Review Author
Jim Pearsall
Published on
March 3, 2014
Company
Eduard
Scale
1/72
MSRP
$14.95

This nifty add on for the Eduard Weekend Bf-110G-4 is mostly for the cockpit, although there are a couple of other parts which made my life easier. The Bf-100G-4 is reviewed here: Eduard Bf-110g-4 weekend kit The ProfiPACK kit comes with the Photoetch.

The cockpit details include better rudder pedals, instrument panels for the front two positions, gun sights for the rear gunner’s position, a new woven seat for the radar operator, seat belts, and throttles. Additionally for outside the cockpit, there are little screens for the intake side of the exhausts, a loop for the antenna on the canopy, the L shaped scissors on the rear of the landing gear legs, and an antenna for under the fuselage.

Review Author
David Wrinkle
Published on
March 3, 2014
Company
Quickboost
Scale
1/48
MSRP
$6.50

Upfront, I want to thank Aires and Quickboost for providing these fine aftermarket bits for our beloved models and to the IPMS USA a big thank you for allowing me to review this Quickboost product.

Admittedly I am proud of the fact I love the stubby World War II fighter. The Rita, Buffalo and certainly the Grumman Wildcat. I have several in my stash including the Hobby Boss 1/48 wildcat and it’s a good looking kit. I snagged the Quickboost exhaust stubs for the wildcat before even looking at the plastic parts. In all honesty, when I finally looked at the original parts, I didn’t think you could improve on them. I was wrong! The original parts are well molded and due to the large diameter exhaust, even the kit parts have an open exhaust. NO need to drill out the opening. Well, where I think the Quickboost parts shine, is the fact the wall thickness is more in line with a scale thickness. The original kit parts are certainly way too thick.

Review Author
Greg Wise
Published on
March 3, 2014
Company
Wingnut Wings, Ltd
Scale
1/32
MSRP
$69.00

History Brief

The dreaded Fokker E.1 was the first fighter aircraft to enter service with the German Luftwaffe in World War I. When it arrived at the front in mid-1915, it set in motion a time known as the "Fokker Scourge," in which the E.1 and its lineal Eindecker siblings achieved air superiority over the Western Front.

The Product

My sample arrived in a higher-end box, commonly associated with quality model kits. The box top features a beautiful color print with the famous Wingnut Wings name found in the upper, right-hand corner. Inside the box, I found the parts well protected in the typical poly bags. The parts themselves were flawless and flash-free, featuring delicate detailing. Also included is a photo-etch fret; an unbelievable color instruction booklet printed on glossy paper, featuring vintage photographs and five full-color plates; and finally, the beautiful decal sheet printed by Cartograf.