Review Author
Paul R. Brown
Published on
November 2, 2015
Company
Eduard
Scale
1/72
MSRP
$9.95

The AS.34 Kormoran missile is a German developed anti-ship missile. The Kormoran 1 was originally designed in the 1960’s for use by the German Navy and was flown on the F-104 and the Tornado. It was also used by Italy. The Kormoran 2 was an updated version of the Kormoran 1, using the same missile body, but with updated avionics, an improved and larger warhead and better rocket motor to give it longer range.

This is another nice set in Brassin’s weapons range and for a change it is not a US or Russian weapon. The set includes one missile body for each of the Kormoran 1 and for the Kormoran 2. Be sure to check which one you are using as they are slightly different, primarily in the exhaust/nozzle area and in the fairings along the side of the missile bodies. The larger rocket fins are apparently different as they are numbered differently while the smaller steering fins are the same on both missiles.

Review Author
Ben Guenther
Published on
November 2, 2015
Company
Master Model
Scale
1/35
MSRP
$11.99

The development of this Russian heavy machine gun started in 1944 and by 1949 it had entered service as an infantry weapon. By the 60's it was withdrawn as it was too heavy to be useful. However, it was also mounted on tanks, BTR's, BRDM-2 and other armor vehicles, even boats. It has heavy fire power and a very long range of 2-3,000m and up to 2,000m vertically as an AA weapon. This version, KPVT (tankovyi) was modified from the infantry version by shortening the receiver, providing a heavier barrel jacket and using a 50-round belt instead of the original 40-round belt. To us Americans, if you convert the 14.5mm it turns out to be .57 caliber. More than half way between the .50 caliber M2 MG and the 20mm round. With the larger bullet and case it provided approximately twice the energy of the .50 caliber round, making it a very formidable weapon.

Review Author
Keith Gervasi
Published on
November 2, 2015
Company
Aoshima
Scale
1/72
MSRP
$12.95

History

Derived from the Ki-61 Hein “Tony” the Ki-100 flew for the first time in February 1945 and without the need for the heavy coolant radiator and other fittings required for a liquid-cooled engine, was lighter than the Ki-61-II thus reducing the wing loading. This had an immediate positive effect on the flight characteristics, enhancing landing and takeoff qualities as well as imparting increased maneuverability, including a tighter turning circle. Pleased by the flight characteristics of the plane the model was ordered to be put in production and the first 271 of the airframes were remanufactured from Ki-61-II Kai and Ki-61-III airframes. Later 118 of the Ki-100 II with an ‘all around view’ canopy were produced. The Ki-100 was the Imperial Japanese Army’s last fighter and in the hands of a skilled pilot was more than a match for allied fighters.

Review Author
Keith Gervasi
Published on
November 2, 2015
Company
Aoshima
Scale
1/72
MSRP
$12.99

History

The N1K was originally developed as a floatplane for forward land bases but by the time it entered service Japan was on the defensive. Kawanishi engineers had proposed in 1941 that the N1K could be a formidable land-based fighter too and a land-based version N1K1-j (J indicated land based fighter modification of the original floatplane version) was produced as a private venture by the company and first flew in December 1942. Due to it being a mid-wing design (because of the floats & large prop) a new design was begun just 4 days after the first test flight. The major defects being addressed were the wing and long landing gear. The wings were moved to a low position, which permitted the use of shorter, conventional undercarriage, the fuselage was lengthened and the tail redesigned. The first flight was on January 1944 and production of the N1K2-J "Shiden-Kai" (Kai standing for Modified) started in April of that year.

Review Author
John King
Published on
November 2, 2015
Company
Revell, Inc.
Scale
1/72
MSRP
$17.95

Background

The MiG-21 FISHBED has been the backbone of numerous air forces throughout the world. Recently, in the modeling community, we have been blessed with many variants of the MiG-21 from multiple manufacturers. This review covers the new release of the 1/72nd Revell of Germany MiG-21F-13 FISHBED C. This kit was previous released by Revell of Germany in 2005. Since the first release, it’s become relatively non-existent. However, that has now all changed with this new release! The only difference between the 2005 and 2015 releases are the decals (there were far more options and stencils in 2005).