Welcome to the IPMS/USA Reviews site!

Introduction: The primary organization of the IPMS/USA Review website is by IPMS/USA National Contest Class. Within each Class there are sub-menus by kits, decals, books, etc. The Miscellaneous Class is for items that are not class specific or that cross two or more classes.

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Manufacturers, publishers, and other industry members: IPMS/USA is pleased to offer your company the opportunity for product reviews. All product reviews are performed by IPMS/USA members, and are posted in the publicly-accessible section of our website. With very few exceptions, we perform full build reviews of new kit releases, aftermarket products, and supplies. If you would care to provide product samples for review, please contact John Noack, IPMS/USA 1st VP.

To learn more about IPMS/USA, please see our About Us page.

Review Author
Brian R. Baker
Published on
Company
Cyber-Hobby
Scale
1/72
MSRP
$33.95

Introduction

The Grumman F6F Hellcat series was one of the most important U.S. Navy carrier fighters of World War II, with the first F6F-3 production models appearing in late 1942. Powered by a P.W. R-2800-10 radial engine of 2000 hp., the fighter was powerful, heavily armed with six .50 cal. machine guns, well protected with armor and self-sealing fuel tanks, and fast, 335 mph. at sea level and 376 mph. at 17,300 ft. Although it could be out-turned by the Zero, its main adversary, it held virtually every other advantage, especially since by the time the Hellcat came into service in 1943, many of the highly experienced Japanese pilots had been lost in combat, and their replacements were poorly trained compared to the American pilots, who entered combat with roughly four times the flying time of their Japanese counterparts.

Book Author(s)
Mark E. Stille
Review Author
Luke R. Bucci, PhD
Published on
Company
Osprey Publishing
MSRP
$17.95

Mark Stille is a retired Commander of the US Navy and has written a succession of books for Osprey Publishing on naval topics. He continues as an intelligence analyst at the Pentagon. New Vanguard 182 covers Italian battleships of World War Two, an obscure topic. Like other Osprey books, an in-depth treatment is not given, but an excellent synopsis of design, characteristics and history of each ship is presented.

Review Author
Ed Kinney
Published on
Company
G Factor
Scale
1/32
MSRP
$20.00

While meandering through the vendors rooms at the Omaha Nationals, I bumped into Ernie Gee while visiting with Gordon Kwan of Sprue Brothers. For those of you who don’t know, I consider Ernie to be the living GrandMaster of lost brass castings such as landing gear, boat propellers, and a multitude of other stuff. He handed these to me and asked if I might review them. Well…here is the review. EXQUISITE! There really isn’t much more to say about the absolutely beautiful work this guy does. (The last Fisher kit I reviewed, the RB-51 Red Baron Racer, had Ernie’s landing gear included, as does the F7U Cutlass I’m currently knee deep into). There can’t be enough good said about the quality of these products. If you haven’t tried any G Factor products, it’s past time. These can be ordered in the U.S. at https://spruebrothers.com and in the United Kingdom at https://www.hannants.co.uk.

Book Author(s)
Youri Obraztsov
Review Author
Mark Aldrich
Published on
Company
Histoire and Collections
MSRP
$27.95

With a title like this and John writing that the text was in French, I assumed this book was going to be all about French Infantry Fighting Vehicles. Yep, I was wrong! As I started thumbing through the book and scanning over the included vehicles, I realized that this was a nice collection book about Infantry Fighting Vehicles all over the world. This is very neat “recognition handbook”. A slight word of warning….This is not a definitive collection of infantry Fighting vehicles by any means. Though a great book, it needs to be more defined by the title.