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Review Author
John Tinay
Published on
Company
Revell, Inc.
Scale
1/25
MSRP
$22.95

Ed “Big Daddy” Roth’s Beatnik Bandit was introduced to the automotive public as the May ’61 cover of Car Craft magazine. The second in his series of show cars, it became popular as it toured the custom car show circuit in the early 60’s. In the next years, “Big Daddy” Ed Roth continued to improve the breed of custom show cars with his creations. The “Fiberglass Wonder” is now permanently housed in Reno, Nevada in the National Auto Museum.

This kit was originally released in the 60’s and has been re-released multiple times. In this incarnation, there are 128 parts, some of which are not called for in the instructions. The kit includes a detailed chassis and suspension, with a blown V-8 engine. The bubble top is hinged and the front wheels are positional. Molded in solid white and clear plastic, there are also numerous chrome-plated parts and soft black tires. The decals are for the authentic Ed Roth designed paint scheme.

Review Author
Rick Ewing
Published on
Company
Eduard
Scale
1/48
MSRP
$34.95

The Albatros D. III was built under license by the Oesterreichische Flugzeugfabrik AG (Oeffag), totaling 281 aircraft (153.01-153.281). These aircraft had beefier lower wings and the powerful 200-hp Daimler engine. The spinner had a nasty habit of coming off during flight and damaging the airframe. Starting with 153.112, the nose was blunted for the remainder of the production run. This change also increased the speed of the aircraft another 9 mph. The main drawback of the plane was the buried and slow firing Schwarzlose guns. At the insistence of the pilots, these were placed on top of the fuselage in the following 253 series.

Review Author
Robert DeMaio
Published on
Company
Italeri
Scale
1/48
MSRP
$56.00

Brief History:

The Junker Ju-87 was developed as a dive bomber for a design competition in the United States in the early 1930’s. Ernst Udet was a leading WWI ace who was part of the new Luftwaffe and had a strong influence on the aircraft performance requirements that the companies had to meet. In 1936 three German aircraft companies competed for a dive bomber. The Ju-87 was most impressive, executing an almost vertical dive and pulling out of it with ease. The competitor He-118 had separated from its propeller and gear box, which was the deciding factor to award production for ten Ju-87A-0 aircraft. The B-2 version used the Jumo 211Da engine with a pressurized coolant radiator, larger propeller and rear pointing exhaust stacks to increase speed. A small propeller mounted on one or both strut boots created a sound during the Stuka’s dive that came to be a psychological effect on people below within hearing range.

In the Box:

Review Author
Roger Carrano
Published on
Company
Eduard
Scale
1/32
MSRP
$54.95

When I first saw this engine on Eduard’s web site, I knew this was going to be, without a doubt, the best version of this engine ever made by any company. This even includes Eduard themselves, because this engine is being used in their kits of the Bf-109 and the Bf-110. I thought at the time that I would ask if I can use this kit to include in my review of the BF-110 but, after receiving it and seeing how great the detail was, I decided to build it as a stand alone and not let all that detail be hidden from view.

Review Author
Roger Rasor
Published on
Company
Ultracast
Scale
1/32
MSRP
$17.95

Ultracast has added a 1/32 scale RAF Battle of Britain pilot to their growing line of resin figures. With the recent releases (and rereleases) of numerous 1/32 scale Spitfire kits, it’s not surprising that this manufacturer has chosen this time to offer a kit that builds into an appropriate figure for this aircraft.

Five light cream-colored resin parts make up this kit and, as with all other offerings from Ultracast, the parts are beautifully cast and bubble free. As the photo below shows, the kit provides the main torso, head (with flying helmet and goggles), left and right arm and legs that are attached to pour blocks by thin connecting sprue that are very easy to remove and clean up. Overall, the details are crisp and the proportions are believable. The flight uniform, boots, helmet and goggles are well sculpted and face is exceptionally well rendered.