Review Author
Chuck Bush
Published on
October 20, 2011
Company
Werners Wings
Scale
1/35
MSRP
$35.00

The UH-60 Blackhawk is America’s current work horse helicopter. One of its most important roles is as a Medevac helicopter. When I was an Independent Duty Medic in Korea in 1987 I was supported by the Army Blackhawks. The kit is molded in molded in resin. Molding is very good, detail is crisp and clean. I found only 2 small bubbles to be filled. Pour blocks are small and the parts can be removed with no damage in a short time.The kit includes the carousel, 4 litter pans and a panel for the ceiling of the cabin with the rotating arm molded on. The carousel can be made to rotate so it can be shown in loading or in flight position. The rotating arm is molded in the inflight position. However, when installed in the helicopter kit, that is hard to see.

The instructions are a single sheet, front and back. There are five pictures of the kit parts and four of the real thing, all in black and white. There is minimal text, but an experienced modeler should be able to cope.

Review Author
Dave Morrissette
Published on
October 19, 2011
Company
Hasegawa
Scale
1/48
MSRP
$89.95

Freshly released from Hasegawa and Hobbico is the best 1/48 scale version of the E/A-18G Growler. This is a modification of their F/A-18F two-seat Super Hornet Kit including four new sprues to allow for the radar jamming pods, extra bumps and antennae and cockpit differences. All the parts are nicely done with engraved panel lines and no flash. Marking are included for lo-viz VFQ-129 Vikings and the CAG from VFA-141. I chose the latter with its black spine and tails- great looking plane.

The kit has several up front things to do. Since this is a modified F version, there are a bunch of holes to open on the forward fuselage, wings, and rear fuselage to allow adding of the changes peculiar to the G version. I missed doing this to the wings and made life much more difficult as this plane has lots of "things under wings". I also decided to fold the wings. This involves some cutting but looks great and the hinges are included.

Review Author
Roger Carrano
Published on
October 19, 2011
Company
Eduard
Scale
1/35
MSRP
$22.95

This newly released radio for the AFV CLUB Nashorn kit is a really nice item. Included in Eduard’s kit are two radios which sit in a bay, one on top of the other, which is positioned between the ammo case and the rear door. Also included in the kit is a small set of headphones which attach to a small box above the radios that allows the operator to listen silently. It’s a pretty neat setup and will look nice in the rear compartment along with other items and stowage for a real look.

Review Author
Jim Pearsall
Published on
September 28, 2021
Company
Platz
Scale
1/144
MSRP
$28.95

The Aircraft

The Kawanishi N1K2-J Shiden (Violet Lightning) was codenamed “George” by the Allies. Development was interesting in that the Shiden was developed from the N1K Kyofu (Strong Wind / Rex), a floatplane.

The Shiden was heavily armed, with 4 x 20 mm cannon in the wings. It was considered the equal of the Hellcat, and could hold its own with the Corsairs and P-51s. As a bomber interceptor, it was hampered by poor rate of climb and inadequate engine performance at high altitudes.

The prototype flew in 1943, and the type entered production in January of 1944. Production never exceeded 83 per month (April and May 1945), and only 423 were produced before VJ day.

There are 4 surviving Shidens, one at the Naval Air Museum at Pensacola, one at the USAF Museum near Dayton, one at the Champlin Air Museum (on loan from the National Air and Space Museum), and one at Shikoku, Japan.

Review Author
Jim Pearsall
Published on
November 23, 2021
Company
Platz
Scale
1/144
MSRP
$28.95

The Aircraft

The Kawanishi N1K2-J Shiden (Violet Lightning) was codenamed “George” by the Allies. Development was interesting in that the Shiden was developed from the N1K Kyofu (Strong Wind / Rex), a floatplane.

The Shiden was heavily armed, with 4 x 20 mm cannon in the wings. It was considered the equal of the Hellcat, and could hold its own with the Corsairs and P-51s. As a bomber interceptor, it was hampered by poor rate of climb and inadequate engine performance at high altitudes.

The prototype flew in 1943, and the type entered production in January of 1944. Production never exceeded 83 per month (April and May 1945), and only 423 were produced before VJ day.

There are 4 surviving Shidens, one at the Naval Air Museum at Pensacola, one at the USAF Museum near Dayton, one at the Champlin Air Museum (on loan from the National Air and Space Museum), and one at Shikoku, Japan.