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Review Author
Frank Landrus
Published on
Company
Master Model
Scale
1/350
MSRP
$17.00

Tsesarevich (Russian: Цесаревич) was a pre-dreadnought battleship of the Imperial Russian Navy, built in France at the end of the 19th century. The ship's design formed the basis of the Russian-built Borodino-class battleships. This set represents what she carried prior to an attack in the night of February 9, 1904, in the Russian-Japanese war. She was one of three ships to be struck by Japanese torpedoes and limped back to Port Arthur. There she lost four of her 75mm, two of her 47mm, and two of her 37mm guns to reinforce the port defenses. After the Russian-Japanese war, Tsesarevich, helped suppress the Sveaborg Rebellion. Around 1906, her fighting top was removed and her superstructure was cut down, in the process losing more guns, mainly most of her 75mm guns. In time, ~ 1914, all of her 75mm guns were removed.

Review Author
Bill O'Malley
Published on
Company
Italeri
Scale
1/12
MSRP
$195.00

Background

From Italeri’s website: The Fiat 806 Grand Prix adopted significant innovations for its time. The Fiat 806 was, in fact, the “progenitor” of the modern Formula One racing cars. Developed and produced by FIAT, the Italian automobile manufacturer in 1927, it could be considered the first Grand Prix car ever built. Thanks to its 180 HP 12 cylinder engine, the Fiat 806 was able to reach and even exceed the speed of 240 Km/h. However, the most important innovations were made in the development of the chassis, mechanics and bodywork. The engine and gearbox unit was, in fact, located between the two chassis bars in order to optimize the performance and the drivability.

Review Author
Paul R. Brown
Published on
Company
Brengun
Scale
1/72
MSRP
$9.75

I think everyone has seen and many of us have used or attempted to use a handcart, or dolly as they are called in many parts of the US. This set from Brengun includes enough parts to build 6 hand carts. The set consists of a photoetch fret of six frames, six base plates and six axles/braces and 12 resin wheels. The photoetch is nicely done and the parts are easily cut out with a set of photoetch scissors. The scissors also make cleaning up the attachment points very easy as well.

Review Author
Floyd S. Werner Jr.
Published on
Company
Eduard
Scale
1/48
MSRP
$12.95

The Academy F-4 series finally brought the Phantom into the present with regards to mold technology. I’ve said it many times I hate to mask canopies. Eduard’s masks are made out of Kabuki tape which makes them flexible and able to conform to bends in the windows. In my opinion Kabuki tape is the premier masking medium.

This set is designed for the Academy F-4D, but it will fit the Academy or Eduard F-4C as well. You will need to use liquid mask to complete this set. There are 12 masks included in the set. This set will ensure that the canopy has crisp edges with minimal work.

These worked to perfection on my recent Eduard F-4D. They were easy to add and easy to remove. They performed flawlessly. If you are careful you can replace them back on the sheet and maybe able to use them again.

Review Author
Keith Gervasi
Published on
Company
Round 2 Models
Scale
1/525
MSRP
$44.95

History

An Essex-class carrier commissioned in 1943, she set more records than any other Essex Class carrier. The Lexington was the oldest working aircraft carrier in the United States Navy when decommissioned in 1991. The Lexington was originally named the USS Cabot but while final construction was being completed at Massachusetts’ Fore River Shipyard word was received that the original carrier named USS LEXINGTON, CV-2, had been sunk and the new carrier’s name was changed to LEXINGTON. The nickname ‘Blue Ghost’ came about due to the Japanese claiming to have sunk the ship 4 times.