Welcome to the IPMS/USA Reviews site!

Introduction: The primary organization of the IPMS/USA Review website is by IPMS/USA National Contest Class. Within each Class there are sub-menus by kits, decals, books, etc. The Miscellaneous Class is for items that are not class specific or that cross two or more classes.

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Manufacturers, publishers, and other industry members: IPMS/USA is pleased to offer your company the opportunity for product reviews. All product reviews are performed by IPMS/USA members, and are posted in the publicly-accessible section of our website. With very few exceptions, we perform full build reviews of new kit releases, aftermarket products, and supplies. If you would care to provide product samples for review, please contact John Noack, IPMS/USA 1st VP.

To learn more about IPMS/USA, please see our About Us page.

Review Author
Rod Lees
Published on
Company
Encore by Squadron
Scale
1/48
MSRP
$51.49

Back in the late 1980’s, I was stationed at Sembach in Germany. Having left England behind in 1986 due to reassignment, the word on aircraft modeling was mostly about what Revell and Italeri were up to. Everything in the shops was Revell or R/C related, and my only link to what was happening in the rest of the static scale world involved the Squadron shop flyers. A friend from Miami sent me a letter saying “sign up for the “Golden Eagle Society” newsletter… the word here is there are going to be 1/48 PBY’s, F-89’s and F-102’s from a major manufacturer…” I signed up, saw the newsletter, and was thinking to myself, “Yeah, right”. But at the same time I had high hopes; we had, in the space of a few years since 1982, seen the F-106 from Monogram, along with the consummate A-10, A-37, and the A-6 (the latter under the Revell label, but it was a Monogram kit based on the stock number lettering tab on the runners).

Review Author
Pablo Bauleo
Published on
Company
Italeri
Scale
1/48
MSRP
$37.00

The Bell “Hueys” have been a workhorse of rotary wing groups in many air forces for decades. The UN-1N/Bell 212 is the twin engine of the ‘Huey’-family, sporting an enlarged fuselage.

This kit is a re-issue of the venerable “Twin Huey” from Italeri. The kit comes in two sprues (molded in medium gray plastic) plus a third sprue of clear parts. There is no flash and no ejector pin is located in any visible area. (Good engineering there!) The sprues include 7.62 mm machine guns. Decals look very nice, although the green on the Italian national markings seems to be a little bit out of register.

Review Author
Bill Kluge
Published on
Company
Roll Models
MSRP
$48.00

Punch & die sets are one of those tools that you don’t think too much about until one day when you need it. Then once you have one, you wonder how you ever did without it. Roll Models now offers the familiar Waldron set containing a punch guide and six punches in the following sizes:

.160”, .120”, .089”, .081”, .059”, and .039”

Book Author(s)
Rick Llinares and Andy Evans
Review Author
Perry Downen
Published on
Company
SAM Publications
MSRP
$30.78

Several weeks ago, I attended a change of command ceremony for a unit of the United States Army Special Forces at Ft. Bragg. My mind was still full of memories of Ft. Bragg and the visit to the Airborne & Special Operations Museum when this book became available for review. I jumped at the chance to do the review. Thank you SAM Publications for providing the review sample.

Review Author
Ben Guenther
Published on
Company
Quickboost
Scale
1/72
MSRP
$7.50

Quickboost is striving mightily to make enough sets for a modeler to make a perfect Spitfire Mk.IX, if that is possible. The latest by their own definition is a 1/72 scale engine cover with radiator. What you actually have is the lower engine cover with carburetor intake. The part is perfectly cast in Quickboost fine grain resin and it only took me a few minutes using a razor saw, snips and a sanding block to remove the casting gate.