Review Author
Chuck Herrmann
Published on
November 18, 2011
Company
Polar Lights
Scale
1/32
MSRP
$23.99

The Subject

The Batmobile is the car of the fictional comic book superhero Batman, an iconic American character. The character of Batman first appeared in DC Comics’ Detective Comics #27 (May 1939). By 1940, Batman proved popular enough to spin off into his own dedicated comic, Batman. In the years since, there have been other comics, books, radio shows, television shows, and films featuring Batman and his related characters and equipment. The car used by Batman, called the Batmobile, appeared in the very first stories in 1939 and has evolved over the years. Perhaps the best known version is the vehicle that appeared in the 1960’s hit TV series Batman, which is the subject of this kit. Designed specifically for the TV show by famous customizer George Barris, the car was a heavily modified former Ford Corporation concept car called the Lincoln Futura.

Review Author
Mike Hinderliter
Published on
November 18, 2011
Company
Aires Hobby Models
Scale
1/72
MSRP
$15.95

Aires now offers a resin cockpit set for the Fujimi F-22 Raptor. This set has very well detailed resin pieces as well as photo etch. They are molded in the standard Aires grey resin and are flash and bubble free. They also include a 4 page, blue paper diagram, which is also a real help.

The resin pieces include a cockpit tub, ejection seat, control console and the hydraulic lifts to hold the canopy in the open position, as well as a very nice looking HUD display. The photo etch is also exceptionally good. It comes with everything else you will need to detail this small work of art. The cockpit that comes with the Fujimi kit will make an acceptable office but the detail that can be added with the Aires set is exceptional. There is just that much more detail when compared to the Fujimi parts. The seat is also beyond comparison. The kit seat is the usual multi part seat that has decal seatbelts while the Aires is much more detailed with photo etch bits and seatbelts.

Book Author(s)
Nicholas Millman
Review Author
Bill Kluge
Published on
November 18, 2011
Company
Osprey Publishing
MSRP
$22.95

Prior to the outbreak of the Pacific War, the Japanese air force pilots (both Army and Navy) were some of the world’s foremost proponents of dogfighting, and the fighters they flew reflected their demand for aircraft that would give them the edge in that realm of aerial combat. Flying lightweight and agile Type 97 Ki-27 s (“Nates” to the Allies), the Japanese Army Air Force’s pilots easily outmaneuvered their opposition in the skies over China and Manchuria in the late 30s, and during the opening days of World War II, JAAF Ki-43 Hayabusas (“Oscars”) more often than not flew rings around Allied fighters over the Southeast Asian battlefields.

Review Author
Tom Moon
Published on
November 18, 2011
Company
Cyber-Hobby
Scale
1/35
MSRP
$54.95

This kit represents a field modification of an SdKfz 10 Halftrack to mount the 3.7cm PaK 35/36 in the bed. The AT gun basically just had the wheels removed and was placed in a specially designed cradle in the bed of the halftrack. The sprues are from the halftrack kit (new) and the 3.7cm PaK kit (old), along with the special sprue for the mounting of the gun. There are Magic Tracks for the tracks and, if you are careful, they will moveable and will allow for a good representation of the track sag. There is one sprue of clear plastic and one small fret of photo etched parts.

Step 1. This step builds the drive sprocket, idler wheel, and the two front wheels. It has been noted elsewhere that the drive sprocket is undersize in both the diameter and the thickness. After I built a run of the track I found that the drive rollers are too wide and, to get the tracks to fit, I had to sand off a little of the drive rollers on both sides.

Book Author(s)
Hans Seidler
Review Author
Marc K. Blackburn
Published on
November 18, 2011
Company
Concord Publications Company
MSRP
$18.95

Concord Publishing has continued its series of illustrated campaign histories. This volume focuses on the siege of Sevastopol from 1941-42. Dimitry Zgonnik has four full color illustrations that highlight the uniforms of German soldiers during this campaign.

Beginning in the fall of 1941, the 11th Army, under the command of Erich von Manstein, was given the objective of capturing the Crimean Peninsula, which, by default, meant neutralizing the Soviet fortress of Sevastopol. After several attempts in the fall of 1941, the Germans failed to capture Sevastopol. In the spring of 1942, Manstein was able to eject the Soviets from the Crimea and besiege Sevastopol. Many buffs remember the Crimean campaign because of the Germans use of the Super gun Gustav which was used to reduce the Soviet fortifications. After a bloody siege, the city fell. The book does not include a map of the campaign, so you will have to look elsewhere to follow along.