Review Author
Phil Pignataro
Published on
June 20, 2011
Company
Dragon Models
Scale
1/72
MSRP
$17.50

The Kit:

Krupp’s Kfz.70 light truck was a workhorse for the German army throughout WW II. Initial production started in 1933 and continued through 1942 with a run of around 7000 units. It was often employed towing light artillery, particularly the PaK 35/36, 3.7cm anti-tank weapon. Dragon has released a kit of this ubiquitous vehicle in 1/72 scale and it’s a little gem. Molded in light gray plastic, the kit features highly detailed parts for both the truck and the towed cannon. The wood grain simulation on the side panels of the truck is noteworthy. Dragon provides decals for three versions, all from unknown units on the Eastern Front circa 1943. One is in winter camouflage. The instructions are typical for Dragon with exploded views showing eleven steps to complete the truck and two steps for the cannon. The last page is a painting and decal guide with color references keyed to Gunze Sangyo paints.

The Build:

Review Author
Ben Guenther
Published on
June 20, 2011
Company
Quickboost
Scale
1/72
MSRP
$4.75

Quickboost has provided the modeler with the means to show his Corsair model not with static elevators, but have them deflected. Cast in the usual fine grain resin, the only flash is on the stabilizer and that is on purpose to ease the extraction of the cast parts from the rubber molds. This flash is very thin and quite easy to remove, posing no problems. A razor saw and a pair of snips is all that is required to remove the parts from the casting gate. Quickboost has provided a drawing on the filler paper that shows what has to be removed.

Book Author(s)
John A Griffin and Anthony L Stachiw
Review Author
John Ratzenberger
Published on
October 19, 2021
Company
Aviaeology
MSRP
$60.00

The full title of this book is: Early Canadian Military Aircraft, Acquisitions, Dispositions, Color Schemes & Markings: Volume 1, Aircraft taken on strength through 1920 with credits to the authors above and also illustrations by Andrew Tattersall (aircraft) and Terry Higgins (maps).

This is the first volume of an intended series which will cover all Canadian military aircraft taken on strength from 1920 through 1938 -- there are 58 such aircraft, and this volume covers the first seven. It's easier to visualize the contents if you know the "taken on strength" date is effectively the first date a particular type is brought aboard, and not just the date individual aircraft were received. The first seven types were taken on strength in 1920 but many aircraft of a type arrived after that date and served through 1929.

Review Author
Chris Smith
Published on
June 20, 2011
Company
Revell, Inc.
Scale
1/24
MSRP
$22.95

History

The Chevrolet Corvette is the quintessential American sports car. Included in the numerous models produced since the cars introduction in 1953 were some very serious performance cars. The L88 version was a special order 427 big block option available for three model years 1967 to 1969. For $5000.00 you got a factory built racecar with over 500 horsepower under the hood. The subject of this kit is the 1968 (some sources say 1969) L88 powered car driven by Dave Heinz and Bob Johnson to first place at both the 12 hour Sebring and the 24hr Daytona races. Some interesting notes about this car include its Ferrari red paint, which was required because this and a sister L88 'Vette were running in two Ferrari slots just to get in the races. A backdoor agreement through Goodyear tires who used their connection to Enzo Ferrari to open the slots. The unusual headlamps were moved up and covered with custom lenses to allow more cooling air into the engine compartment. The confederate stripes were a response to another car painted in a stars and stripes livery. The resulting victories put the Corvette and GM on the map for a class of racing traditionally dominated by foreign manufacturers.

Book Author(s)
Jose Fernandez
Review Author
Brian R. Baker
Published on
June 20, 2011
Company
Stratus
MSRP
$23.00

The Story

Although many companies in France produced fighters during the interwar period, Nieuport manufactured two landmark fighters beginning with the end of World War I. The Ni-D 29 biplane fighter appeared at the end of the war, and was produced for the Aeronautique Militaire during the twenties, as well as in several foreign countries. Export models were also sold to Belgium, Italy, Siam, Argentina, Spain, and Sweden. By the mid twenties, it was obvious that a replacement would be needed soon, and Nieuport then developed a high wing monoplane replacement, the Ni-D 62 series, many of which were built with a small stub wing, making it sort of a biplane. There were numerous variations in the production models, with differences in powerplant, wing arrangement, and fuselage structure. These were first built for the French, but later, many were sold to Spain, Romania, and Brazil. These aircraft served for many years, some being used as trainers as late as 1940. They were not particularly easy to fly, and were used in Spain after they were outdated, but they still were effective fighters under the right circumstances.