Review Author
Roger Rasor
Published on
October 11, 2010
Company
Wingnut Wings, Ltd
Scale
1/32
MSRP
$59.00

Part I

Wingnut Wings has released two 1/32 scale Sopwith Pup kits, one containing parts and multiple markings for the Royal Navy version and one containing parts and markings for the Royal Flying Corps version. The subject of this review is the RFC version.

If you build plastic model airplanes and have not heard of this kit manufacturer before, you must have been spending a year or so under a rock somewhere. Wingnut Wings is a New Zealand-based company with a passion for World War I subjects in general and aircraft in particular. This new company made a big splash in the hobby last year when they released their first four World War I kits and created an even bigger wave this year when they released four more. Everything is 1/32 scale and produced at a level that leaves most other kits in the dust. The almost overwhelming response to the release of the first kits was a wide-eyed Wow andthe latest kits deserve the same response.

Review Author
Floyd S. Werner Jr.
Published on
October 11, 2010
Company
Quickboost
Scale
1/48
MSRP
$6.50

The Hasegawa Stuka kits are really nice. They could use some help when it comes to the night bomber variants. That is where Quickboost comes in. They offer three different variants of the night bomber exhausts. This particular exhaust, Type C, is shaped at an angle with beautiful detail inside the front and rear parts. Molded in bubble free light grey plastic with exquisite detail, these exhausts will add to the unique look of your Stuka.

Simply cut the parts from the pour stub and paint. Easy and effective. Of course you’ll have to check your references to determine which exhaust is right for your aircraft.

I recommend you read over “Ghost Bombers”. (ISBN-13:978-1903223154). This provides plenty of motivational reading and drawings.

Highly recommended

Thanks to Quickboost for the review copy.

Review Author
Floyd S. Werner Jr.
Published on
October 11, 2010
Company
Quickboost
Scale
1/48
MSRP
$8.50

It is no surprise that I love the Eduard FW-190 kits. I’ve built enough of them to know that I will build more of them. The recent release of the D-9, D-11/13 variants has done nothing to deter this view. One way to set your 190 from the others is to lower the flaps which is seen frequently on operational aircraft.

Molded in light grey resin these flaps have two parts per wing. The conversion set is easy enough to do. After removing the parts from the resin pour blocks simply add the wing stiffeners to the upper wing. There is no cutting here. Simply remove the flaps from the lower wing and add the exquisitely molded flaps. Lightening holes and really thin doublers are just beautiful done and will add to your model. It is a lot simpler than having to bend photo etch and is just as effective.

This product is highly recommended.

Review Author
John Ratzenberger
Published on
October 11, 2010
Company
Pavla Models
Scale
1/72
MSRP
$22.00

Allow me to start by thanking Pavla Models for their most generous contribution of numerous models for review by IPMS/USA.

Background

The Gloster G.40 Pioneer was the first British jet -- it is also known as the Gloster Whittle or the Gloster E.28/39. There were two aircraft built but the second crashed so this one, W4041/G, did all the testing from its first flight on 15 May 1941 until it was put on display in the London Science Museum in 1946.

I asked for this not because I am particularly interested in the aircraft but because I had just done the FROG version for the Classic British Kits SIG display at Scale Model World (Telford) in 2009. That kit is so bad that I felt I should have a better representation on my shelf. For those of you not familiar with the FROG kit, the wings and fuselage are two different scales and the two figures -- one sitting, one standing -- are also.

Book Author(s)
Model Art
Review Author
Scott Hollingshead
Published on
October 11, 2010
Company
Model Art
MSRP
$12.00

The July publication of Model Art Modeling Magazine celebrates the eight hundredth issue of this periodical, and commemorates this landmark with a special focus on the Formula one cars of Ayrton Senna from 1984 to 1994. The magazine also includes new kit reviews, modeling tips, and new kit and item releases. As is typical for Model Art, the magazine measures 182mm by 258mm (about 71/8 by 101/8 inches), and is printed on thick, glossy paper. The production quality is high with these magazines, and just over half of it is printed in color with black and white pages interspersed throughout of the issue. Just in case this is the first review of a Model Art magazine that you are reading, understand that the entire magazine is printed in Japanese with only an occasional English subtitle for those of us who are monolingual.